Bill Wilson, 1999

Core Truth: When you find yourself in the urgency of life, the urgency of life will change you. One person who crosses the line can make a difference!

Bill Wilson, Pastor of Metro Ministries in New York City, shares incredible and personal stories from growing up and serving in the inner city. Metro Ministries has ministered to thousands of kids through its sidewalk Sunday School that operates 7 days a week using a bus system to pick them up. In this session Bill Wilson addresses the question, “Do you honestly believe one person can make a difference?” Using the example of Aaron from Numbers 16, the answer is a resounding “YES” as students are challenged to take the fire of God and stand “between the living and the dead.”

Through this powerful session, Momentum (then Brethren National Youth Conference) witnessed a revival in the lives of students. At the end of the session, Bill Wilson said when he counted to three anyone who wanted to come to the altar should come. By time he reached “2” students were jumping over seats to get to the front. As the evening progressed, students returned to their dorms and brought back items that were causing them to sin and they put them in trash cans. Things like pornography, drugs, illicit materials, and objects students identified as idols in their lives were piled up in the trash cans. The next day a garbage truck came and took away all the full cans. People who experienced BNYC 1999 refer to this session as the “trash can revival.” Watch the accompanying recap video of the session to see if God might be calling your heart to revival as well.

This session has been converted from its original VHS archived form. The video does have a few glitches in it, but the audio is consistent. Please bear with it as you watch.

Please note that because of the nature of Bill’s ministry, the true stories he incorporates from his experience may be sensitive for younger students.

Talk It Over

  1. What would it look like for you to “cross the invisible line?” Aaron and Moses were close enough to the urgency of life they were compelled to act. What does being close to the urgency of life look like for you? In your community?
  2. Do you think one person can truly make a difference? If so, what does that person’s life look like?
  3. In your life, what stands in the way of you crossing the line to make a difference? Is there an idol, a relationship, expectations of others, something you love more than Jesus, or a comfort, that’s keeping you from being changed by the urgency of life?
  4. Aaron stood between the living and the dead and where he stood the death stopped. What did he do in order for this to happen?
  5. Bill says the reason he can do what he does in his life and ministry is because he “ran to an altar once, got some fire, and then went.” Do you have the fire of God and if so, what are you doing with it?

Bill Wilson, 1999

Core Truth: When we choose to cross the invisible line and live around the urgency of life, we can stand in the gap between the living and the dead for God. One person can make a difference.

Bill Wilson, Pastor of Metro Ministries in New York City, shares incredible stories from his experiences and ministry in the inner city. Metro Ministries has ministered to thousands of kids through its sidewalk Sunday School that operates 7 days a week using a bus system to pick them up. Through this session Bill Wilson addresses the question, what does it take for one person to choose to “cross the line” and make an eternal difference, standing in the gap between the living and the dead?

Through this powerful session, Momentum (then Brethren National Youth Conference) witnessed a revival in the lives of students. At the end of the session, Bill Wilson said when he counted to three anyone who wanted to come to the altar should come forward. By time he reached “2” students where jumping over seats to get to the front. As the evening progressed, students returned to their dorms and brought back items that were causing them to sin and they put them in trash cans. Things like pornography, drugs, illicit materials, and objects students identified as idols in their lives where piled up in the trash cans. The next day a dump truck came and took away all the full cans. People who experienced BNYC 1999 refer to this session as the “trash can revival.” Watch the accompanying recap video of the session to see some of the experience.

This session has been converted from it’s original VHS archived form. The video does have a few glitches in it, but the audio is consistent. Please just bear with it as you watch.

Please note that because of the nature of Bill’s ministry, the true stories he incorporates from his experiences may be too sensitive for younger students.

Talk It Over

1. What would it look like in your life for you to “cross the line?” Aaron and Moses were close enough to the urgency of life that they felt compelled to act. What does being close to the urgency of life look like in your context?

2. Do you think one person can make a difference? If so, what kind of person is it that does?

3. In your life, what stands in the way for you to cross the line and make a difference?

4. Aaron stood between the living and the dead and where he stood the death stopped. What did he do in order for this to happen?

5.  Bill says the reason he can do what he does in his life and ministry is because he “ran to an altar once, got some fire, and then went.” Do you have the fire of God and if so, what are you doing with it?

    E.V. Hill, 2001

    Core Truth: Seek to save every sinner, reconciling them to God, to all races, and to their families.

    The late Reverend E.V. Hill, senior pastor at the Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church in Los Angeles, California from 1961 until his death in 2003, delivered an impassioned sermon at Momentum 2001 at Biola University. From Second Corinthians 3:16–20, he challenged attendees that the Christian Church must deal with three areas of reconciliation or it will be doomed.

    Talk It Over

    1. What needs to change in your life to remove your blindness in order to see people all around you in need of salvation through Jesus Christ?
    2. What is easier for you: to send money and prayers to the ends of the earth to see people saved or to walk across the street and share Jesus with your neighbor on your block? Would you be willing to begin walking your block for Christ—praying for your neighbors and sharing Christ to those with whom you interact?
    3. E.V. Hill said that the souls who live next to you—if you’ve never tried to share Christ with them—will be a testimony against you. What stands out to you about this statement? What does it motivate in your heart?
    4. Take some time—even now—to pause and ask God to reveal any hatred or racial discrimination in your heart because of the color of someone’s skin. Confess this sin and declare as E.V. Hill challenged to “Never Again!” allow this to be true of you. Then, what are a few ways you can begin working to bring racial reconciliation in your community?
    5. E.V. Hill shared a moving story of his estranged relationship with his biological father and how God moved him from hatred to love. Is there a relationship in your life that needs reconciled? What are some practical steps you can begin to take today to either confess your sin or offer forgiveness where needed?

    E.V. Hill, 2001

    Core Truth: Seek to save every sinner, reconciling them to God, to all races, and to their families.

    The late Reverend E.V. Hill, senior pastor at the Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church in Los Angeles, California from 1961 until his death in 2003, delivered an impassioned sermon at Momentum 2001 at Biola University. From Second Corinthians 3:16–20, he challenged attendees that the Christian Church must deal with three areas of reconciliation or it will be doomed.

    Talk It Over

    1. What needs to change in your life to remove your blindness in order to see people all around you in need of salvation through Jesus Christ?
    2. What is easier for you: to send money and prayers to the ends of the earth to see people saved or to walk across the street and share Jesus with your neighbor on your block? Would you be willing to begin walking your block for Christ—praying for your neighbors and sharing Christ to those with whom you interact?
    3. E.V. Hill said that the souls who live next to you—if you’ve never tried to share Christ with them—will be a testimony against you. What stands out to you about this statement? What does it motivate in your heart?
    4. Take some time—even now—to pause and ask God to reveal any hatred or racial discrimination in your heart because of the color of someone’s skin. Confess this sin and declare as E.V. Hill challenged to “Never Again!” allow this to be true of you. Then, what are a few ways you can begin working to bring racial reconciliation in your community?
    5. E.V. Hill shared a moving story of his estranged relationship with his biological father and how God moved him from hatred to love. Is there a relationship in your life that needs reconciled? What are some practical steps you can begin to take today to either confess your sin or offer forgiveness where needed?

    Francis Chan, 2005

    Core Truth: Trials are God’s means to lead those who love Him to holy maturity.

    Using vivid and practical illustrations, Francis Chan unpacks God’s purpose in trials for those who love Him and the perspective with which He sees what they are unable to see. When followers of Jesus persevere through trials as James 1:2–12 challenges, God leads them to holiness and joy.

    Talk It Over

    1. Of the illustrations Francis Chan used to explain James 1:2–12, which one stood out to you and helped you connect the dots of Scripture to your life?
    2. Why are trials something we should walk through with joy? Why is this difficult? What makes it possible for a follower of Jesus to consider trials with pure joy?
    3. If you were completely honest with yourself, would you choose to be happy and get everything you’ve ever wanted for one year or would you choose to be holy, yet have a difficult and trying year of life? What makes this a hard choice?
    4. In the midst of trials, what is promised to those who ask? Why is this such a good gift that is so very needed as we are in the middle of trials?
    5. Think of one or two difficult times you’ve had in your life so far but aren’t current trials. What are some ways you can see now how God was working to make you holy through it?
    6. Consider a current trial in your life: what do you need to do in order to love God as you go through it? What do you need to remind yourself about in order to persevere?

    Francis Chan, 2005

    Core Truth: Trials are God’s means to lead those who love Him to holy maturity.

    Using vivid and practical illustrations, Francis Chan unpacks God’s purpose in trials for those who love Him and the perspective with which He sees what they are unable to see. When followers of Jesus persevere through trials as James 1:2–12 challenges, God leads them to holiness and joy.

    Talk It Over

    1. Of the illustrations Francis Chan used to explain James 1:2–12, which one stood out to you and helped you connect the dots of Scripture to your life?
    2. Why are trials something we should walk through with joy? Why is this difficult? What makes it possible for a follower of Jesus to consider trials with pure joy?
    3. If you were completely honest with yourself, would you choose to be happy and get everything you’ve ever wanted for one year or would you choose to be holy, yet have a difficult and trying year of life? What makes this a hard choice?
    4. In the midst of trials, what is promised to those who ask? Why is this such a good gift that is so very needed as we are in the middle of trials?
    5. Think of one or two difficult times you’ve had in your life so far but aren’t current trials. What are some ways you can see now how God was working to make you holy through it?
    6. Consider a current trial in your life: what do you need to do in order to love God as you go through it? What do you need to remind yourself about in order to persevere?

    Nick Vujicic, 2006

    Core Truth: No matter the circumstances, God asks us to shine for him.

    Nick Vujicic speaks passionately about God’s grace and calling. Born without arms and legs, Nick has learned amid personal trials how God cares for us and works through us. He blends humor with biblical insight to call students to embrace God’s anointing: they are fearfully and wonderfully made to shine God’s light to those around them.

    Talk It Over

    1. What was your first reaction when you saw Nick’s physical condition? How did that reaction change as his talk progressed?
    2. Read Isaiah 61:1-3. What does this passage call us to do as God’s message-bearers? What are some practical ways we can live this out? (NOTE: Jesus preached this passage in his first sermon in Luke 4).

      3. Nick says, “I thought the only way I would have joy and peace and victory in my life was because God would change my circumstances. God is a good God not because of your circumstances but God is a good God because he is faithful.” What circumstances have blinded you to the goodness of God? What circumstances remind you of His goodness?

      4. What does 2 Corinthians 12:10 say about God in the face of our struggles? How have you experienced this truth?

      5. Nick referred to three obstacles to shining for God. What were they? Of these three, which proves most challenging to you?

    Nick Vujicic, 2006

    Core Truth: No matter the circumstances, God asks us to shine for him.

    Nick Vujicic speaks passionately about God’s grace and calling. Born without arms and legs, Nick has learned amid personal trials how God cares for us and works through us. He blends humor with biblical insight to call students to embrace God’s anointing: they are fearfully and wonderfully made to shine God’s light to those around them.

    Talk It Over

    1. What was your first reaction when you saw Nick’s physical condition? How did that reaction change as his talk progressed?
    2. Read Isaiah 61:1-3. What does this passage call us to do as God’s message-bearers? What are some practical ways we can live this out? (NOTE: Jesus preached this passage in his first sermon in Luke 4).

      3. Nick says, “I thought the only way I would have joy and peace and victory in my life was because God would change my circumstances. God is a good God not because of your circumstances but God is a good God because he is faithful.” What circumstances have blinded you to the goodness of God? What circumstances remind you of His goodness?

      4. What does 2 Corinthians 12:10 say about God in the face of our struggles? How have you experienced this truth?

      5. Nick referred to three obstacles to shining for God. What were they? Of these three, which proves most challenging to you?

    Sean McDowell, 2012

    Core Truth: True and undefiled religion means defending the unborn.

    Professor, author, and speaker Sean McDowell defends the value of the unborn. Providing three key premises, Sean argues that the unborn are living, human, image-bearers. Moreover, true religion fights for their protection (James 1:27). Sean weaves in stories from his family and encounters with skeptics on the topic. His winsome approach will bolster young people to stand for truth.

    Talk It Over

    1. What are examples of an inconsistent “life” ethic from people in our culture?

    2. What does Sean mean when he says, “I’m Pro-choice”? What factors in his family life compel him to defend the life of the unborn?

    3. Read Genesis 1:26-28. What are some reasons we grant people value in our day? Be specific. What is the biblical basis for granting value to others?

    4. What three premises does Sean provide to defend life for the unborn? How would you validate his premises?

    5. Sean describes four ways the unborn are different from their mother or father. What are these? Do these reasons undermine the unborn’s humanity? Explain.

    6. How does this protection for the unborn translate to other vulnerable people? Who are vulnerable people God has called you to care for? What are you doing about it?

    Sean McDowell, 2012

    Core Truth: True and undefiled religion means defending the unborn.

    Professor, author, and speaker Sean McDowell defends the value of the unborn. Providing three key premises, Sean argues that the unborn are living, human, image-bearers. Moreover, true religion fights for their protection (James 1:27). Sean weaves in stories from his family and encounters with skeptics on the topic. His winsome approach will bolster young people to stand for truth.

    Talk It Over

    1. What are examples of an inconsistent “life” ethic from people in our culture?

    2. What does Sean mean when he says, “I’m Pro-choice”? What factors in his family life compel him to defend the life of the unborn?

    3. Read Genesis 1:26-28. What are some reasons we grant people value in our day? Be specific. What is the biblical basis for granting value to others?

    4. What three premises does Sean provide to defend life for the unborn? How would you validate his premises?

    5. Sean describes four ways the unborn are different from their mother or father. What are these? Do these reasons undermine the unborn’s humanity? Explain.

    6. How does this protection for the unborn translate to other vulnerable people? Who are vulnerable people God has called you to care for? What are you doing about it?

    Afshin Ziafat, 2012

    Core Truth: When the Gospel transforms your life, you go.

    Afshin Ziafat shares his powerful testimony, challenging us to give up the life we had imagined for ourselves to follow God’s plan, because the Gospel calls us to go. When you truly understand the Gospel it transforms your heart, causes you to lose your idols and serve God, and then it sends you. The impact you will have on others for eternity will overflow from the Gospel impacting and transforming your life.

    Talk It Over

    ,

    1. Read 1 Thessalonians 1:4–10. In what ways did the Gospel help the Thessalonians become a model to other believers? What indication was given that the Gospel actually made a difference in their lives?
    2. Ministry to those who are “unseen” is important (James 1:27), but Afshin described a process which puts the Gospel first and ministry as something which overflows from a transformed life. Why is the Gospel central to ministry to others?
    3. The Gospel transforms our lives when we turn to God, but also when we repent and turn from idols. What are some idols of your heart that are holding you back from being sent to serve others?
    4. Have you ever had a clear direction to serve God with your life that you’ve forgotten or pushed away with the busyness and dreams of this life? Afshin’s sister described this kind of life as living like a “fish out of water.” What should you do today in order to surrender to Jesus and reclaim God’s calling on your life?
    5. The Gospel is a sending Gospel. Where do you sense God sending you? To whom? What is standing in your way from going?
    6. God may not call you to literally die as B.J. Higgins did, but what is at least one area of your life that must die in order to fully live for Christ?
    7. Has there been a time in your life when you truly understood the Gospel and surrendered your life to Jesus for salvation from your sins?

    Afshin Ziafat, 2012

    Core Truth: When the Gospel transforms your life, you go.

    Afshin Ziafat shares his powerful testimony, challenging us to give up the life we had imagined for ourselves to follow God’s plan, because the Gospel calls us to go. When you truly understand the Gospel it transforms your heart, causes you to lose your idols and serve God, and then it sends you. The impact you will have on others for eternity will overflow from the Gospel impacting and transforming your life.

    Talk It Over

    1. Read 1 Thessalonians 1:4–10. In what ways did the Gospel help the Thessalonians become a model to other believers? What indication was given that the Gospel actually made a difference in their lives?
    2. Ministry to those who are “unseen” is important (James 1:27), but Afshin described a process which puts the Gospel first and ministry as something which overflows from a transformed life. Why is the Gospel central to ministry to others?
    3. The Gospel transforms our lives when we turn to God, but also when we repent and turn from idols. What are some idols of your heart that are holding you back from being sent to serve others?
    4. Have you ever had a clear direction to serve God with your life that you’ve forgotten or pushed away with the busyness and dreams of this life? Afshin’s sister described this kind of life as living like a “fish out of water.” What should you do today in order to surrender to Jesus and reclaim God’s calling on your life?
    5. The Gospel is a sending Gospel. Where do you sense God sending you? To whom? What is standing in your way from going?
    6. God may not call you to literally die as B.J. Higgins did, but what is at least one area of your life that must die in order to fully live for Christ?
    7. Has there been a time in your life when you truly understood the Gospel and surrendered your life to Jesus for salvation from your sins?

    Keith Minier, 2013

    Core Truth: “I am second” means to have less I and more I AM.

    Keith Minier challenges students that to live second we need to replace our wants and our ways with God’s wants and God’s ways. We need to make Him famous and we can do this, but we must: 1) choose the right reputation to make famous; 2) learn to be alright with being the only one; and 3) train to win in that moment.

    Talk It Over

    1. Keith tells a story of sharing a pizza that went wrong. When have you experienced something similar where your wants and lack of willingness to share were a roadblock to a relationship?

    2. Reading back over John 3:22–30, what were John’s disciples concerned about? What was John the Baptist’s primary concern?

    3. When you evaluate your heart and motives, whose reputation are you most concerned about making famous? What evidence from your life supports your answer (consider what you post about, take photos of, share, spend your time doing, or what you spend your money)?

    4. What is something you would be the only one to do that might make you not fit in with your friends? How would you feel if this choice to stand up for what’s right caused you to lose a friend?

    5. Be honest: if a moment to choose to make God famous or yourself famous came, would you be ready to be second? What choice can you make today to begin training for that moment?

    6. What is one area you are holding onto as yours that needs to be given to the great I AM? If you are still holding on to everything, what is keeping you from giving your whole life to Jesus?

    Keith Minier, 2013

    Core Truth: “I am second” means to have less I and more I AM.

    Keith Minier challenges students that to live second we need to replace our wants and our ways with God’s wants and God’s ways. We need to make Him famous and we can do this, but we must: 1) choose the right reputation to make famous; 2) learn to be alright with being the only one; and 3) train to win in that moment.

    Talk It Over

      1. Keith tells a story of sharing a pizza that went wrong. When have you experienced something similar where your wants and lack of willingness to share were a roadblock to a relationship?
      2. Reading back over John 3:22–30, what were John’s disciples concerned about? What was John the Baptist’s primary concern?
      3. When you evaluate your heart and motives, whose reputation are you most concerned about making famous? What evidence from your life supports your answer (consider what you post about, take photos of, share, spend your time doing, or spend your money)?
      4. What is something you would be the only one to do that might make you not fit in with your friends? How would you feel if this choice to stand up for what’s right caused you to lose a friend?
      5. Be honest: if a moment to choose to make God famous or yourself famous came, would you be ready to be second? What choice can you make today to begin training for that moment?
      6. What is one area you are holding onto as yours that needs to be given to the great I AM? If you are still holding on to everything, what is keeping you from giving your whole life to Jesus?

    Clayton King, 2016

    Core Truth: We are forgiven because God loves, not because we’re good.

    It’s too easy to believe the narrative that we are essentially good people. We overlook our sin and selfishness. We overstate our good deeds. Fortunately, no amount of good or bad can separate us from God when we ask for His forgiveness. Confession is the key to unlock God’s cleansing.

    Talk It Over

    Read Luke 23:32-55 (Crucifixion cf., Matt. 27:32-54; Mark. 15:21-39; John 19:16-37)

    1. At the very end of his life, Jesus was surrounded by sinners, a thief on either side. According to Clayton, what is the significance of Jesus having a sinner on either side of Him?

    2. Clayton mentions sheep and goats as two responses to God. This notion of Two Responses or Two Ways is consistent in Jesus’ teaching (Matthew 7, 25, cf. Psalm 1 and Proverbs 1). How does it help to think of your life as one of two directions rather than a decision?

    3. Clayton notes four movements moving the thief from death to life, from condemned to forgiven. What are the four movements? What is a good definition of confession?

    4. Read 1 John 1:5-9. What does this tell us about confession?

    5. What keeps people from confessing sin? (Think about personal shame, bad theology, etc.)

    6. Clayton said, “Quit trying to hide your past, your sins. There are no secrets from Jesus. He loves us because He’s God, not because we’re good.” How easy is it to believe this? How helpful?

    7. This thief did nothing good, but confessed in the eleventh hour and died with confidence in Jesus. What does this tell us about compiling good deeds to earn salvation?

    Clayton King, 2016

    Core Truth: We are forgiven because God loves, not because we’re good.

    It’s too easy to believe the narrative that we are essentially good people. We overlook our sin and selfishness. We overstate our good deeds. Fortunately, no amount of good or bad can separate us from God when we ask for His forgiveness. Confession is the key to unlock God’s cleansing.

    Talk It Over

    Read Luke 23:32-55 (Crucifixion cf., Matt. 27:32-54; Mark. 15:21-39; John 19:16-37)

    1. At the very end of his life, Jesus was surrounded by sinners, a thief on either side. According to Clayton, what is the significance of Jesus having a sinner on either side of Him?

    2. Clayton mentions sheep and goats as two responses to God. This notion of Two Responses or Two Ways is consistent in Jesus’ teaching (Matthew 7, 25, cf. Psalm 1 and Proverbs 1). How does it help to think of your life as one of two directions rather than a decision?

    3. Clayton notes four movements moving the thief from death to life, from condemned to forgiven. What are the four movements? What is a good definition of confession?

    4. Read 1 John 1:5-9. What does this tell us about confession?

    5. What keeps people from confessing sin? (Think about personal shame, bad theology, etc.)

    6. Clayton said, “Quit trying to hide your past, your sins. There are no secrets from Jesus. He loves us because He’s God, not because we’re good.” How easy is it to believe this? How helpful?

    7. This thief did nothing good, but confessed in the eleventh hour and died with confidence in Jesus. What does this tell us about compiling good deeds to earn salvation?

    Jackie Hill Perry, 2017

    Core Truth: God calls our whole self to holiness.

    Jackie Hill-Perry tells her story of coming out of a godless lifestyle, including a lesbian relationship. God saved her whole self, not just the sexually compromised parts, and brought her to a place of surrender. Her story encourages followers of Jesus to give their whole lives to holiness, trusting God can turn any sinful bent to glorious surrender.

    Talk It Over

    1. What did Jackie learn about sexuality from struggles in her childhood?

    2. Jackie contrasted her believing Aunt from her unbelieving mother. Her singing and forgiving made her stand out. Who in your life stands out for their Christ-like attitude?

    3. As she started to express her lesbian lifestyle, Jackie said, “In this phase, Christians looked past me.” What were the three possible reasons she supposed they responded this way? When you see people who express their sexuality and gender differently, how do you respond?

    4. The turning point for Jackie was when God said to her, “The girl you are with will be the death of you.” She clarified: It was not her lesbianism lifestyle, but her lifestyle, period. What is the difference? Why do we treat sexual (especially homosexual) sin in isolation from other sin?

    5. Jackie stated, “The problem is I asked God to save me from one thing, not to save all of me.” How does this idea intersect with the biblical concepts of salvation and sanctification?

    6. “When you preach Jesus, he’s not calling us to heterosexuality,” Jackie said. “He’s calling us to holiness. Heterosexuality is not the goal; holiness is.” Where is holiness lacking in your life?

    7. Jackie warned against confusing sin and temptation. “Temptation does not define our identity.” Why was she so strong on this clarification?

    8. Read 1 Corinthians 6:9-11, 18-20; 10:31. What confidence do we have in facing temptation?

    9. Read Colossians 1:16. How does Jackie relate this verse to our bodies and holiness?

    10. What aspects of your life and body do you need to surrender to God’s holiness?

    Jackie Hill Perry, 2017

    Core Truth: God calls our whole self to holiness.

    Jackie Hill-Perry tells her story of coming out of a godless lifestyle, including a lesbian relationship. God saved her whole self, not just the sexually compromised parts, and brought her to a place of surrender. Her story encourages followers of Jesus to give their whole lives to holiness, trusting God can turn any sinful bent to glorious surrender.

    Talk It Over

    1. What did Jackie learn about sexuality from struggles in her childhood?

    2. Jackie contrasted her believing Aunt from her unbelieving mother. Her singing and forgiving made her stand out. Who in your life stands out for their Christ-like attitude?

    3. As she started to express her lesbian lifestyle, Jackie said, “In this phase, Christians looked past me.” What were the three possible reasons she supposed they responded this way? When you see people who express their sexuality and gender differently, how do you respond?

    4. The turning point for Jackie was when God said to her, “The girl you are with will be the death of you.” She clarified: It was not her lesbianism lifestyle, but her lifestyle, period. What is the difference? Why do we treat sexual (especially homosexual) sin in isolation from other sin?

    5. Jackie stated, “The problem is I asked God to save me from one thing, not to save all of me.” How does this idea intersect with the biblical concepts of salvation and sanctification?

    6. “When you preach Jesus, he’s not calling us to heterosexuality,” Jackie said. “He’s calling us to holiness. Heterosexuality is not the goal; holiness is.” Where is holiness lacking in your life?

    7. Jackie warned against confusing sin and temptation. “Temptation does not define our identity.” Why was she so strong on this clarification?

    8. Read 1 Corinthians 6:9-11, 18-20; 10:31. What confidence do we have in facing temptation?

    9. Read Colossians 1:16. How does Jackie relate this verse to our bodies and holiness?

    10. What aspects of your life and body do you need to surrender to God’s holiness?

    C.L. Shepherd, 2018

    Core Truth: Authentic resolve is not just verbal, it must be physical.

    C.L. Shepherd shares his testimony about growing up in extreme poverty without a relationship with or knowledge of his father. With his experience of Christianity being represented by an indifferent church, he sunk into suicidal despair, and it was there that he found God’s great salvation. Through discipleship with Fellowship of Christian Athletes, summer camps, and a college scholarship, Shep eventually advanced to the NFL and uses his testimony to continue to glorify God and spur people on to see others around them through the love of Christ.

    Talk It Over

    1. Which of the stages or themes of Shep’s powerful testimony touched your heart the most? Explain why.

    2. Most of us know nothing of the poverty described—”only fingerprints and light bulbs in my fridge”—but nonetheless have unhealthy views of wealth. How do you think about money? How often? What do you do with it?

    3. Read James 2:14-17. How does this text support Shep’s definition of resolve? Why do we often use prayer to keep distance from others?

    4. Shep comments, “I’d rather be lonely going up than have company going down.” What are ways you go against the flow to show God’s love?

    5. Shep admits, “After salvation, before discipleship, I was still waiting to die.” What hope did discipleship offer him? Who disciples you? How?

    C.L. Shepherd, 2018

    Core Truth: Authentic resolve is not just verbal, it must be physical.

    C.L. Shepherd shares his testimony about growing up in extreme poverty without a relationship with or knowledge of his father. With his experience of Christianity being represented by an indifferent church, he sunk into suicidal despair, and it was there that he found God’s great salvation. Through discipleship with Fellowship of Christian Athletes, summer camps, and a college scholarship, Shep eventually advanced to the NFL and uses his testimony to continue to glorify God and spur people on to see others around them through the love of Christ.

    Talk It Over

    1. Which of the stages or themes of Shep’s powerful testimony touched your heart the most? Explain why.

    2. Most of us know nothing of the poverty described—”only fingerprints and light bulbs in my fridge”—but nonetheless have unhealthy views of wealth. How do you think about money? How often? What do you do with it?

    3. Read James 2:14-17. How does this text support Shep’s definition of resolve? Why do we often use prayer to keep distance from others?

    4. Shep comments, “I’d rather be lonely going up than have company going down.” What are ways you go against the flow to show God’s love?

    5. Shep admits, “After salvation, before discipleship, I was still waiting to die.” What hope did discipleship offer him? Who disciples you? How?

    Jeff Bogue, 2018

    Core Truth: Tough resolve means taking a hit for Jesus.

    Jeff Bogue commissions students on the last night of Momentum to realize as they go home, they will “take a hit” if they are truly resolved to follow Jesus.  Note the three biblical voices Jeff cites who warn us of the hits we will face as Christ-followers: 1) Jesus warns us we will be hated; 2) Peter predicts we will face fiery trials; 3) Paul acknowledges suffering is inevitable, but it serves to draw us closer to Jesus.

    Talk It Over

    1. Jeff says one of culture’s biggest lies is that God wants to prosper us. He calls it a  heresy. What is heresy? What makes this heresy so awful?
    2. Read 2 Corinthians 4:16-18. What does this teach us about Paul’s resolve in suffering? What can suffering teach us about God? Us?
    3. Jeff speaks candidly about suffering he has faced as a pastor. What makes full-time ministry so potentially painful? Is God calling you to it?
    4. Jeff teaches, “If you go home and fit in, you’re probably not resolved.” Where do you fit in where you shouldn’t? Where do you stand out?
    5. Avoiding little acts of suffering in church (i.e., holding our bladder until the sermon ends) shows little resolve. What little acts of suffering do you avoid for your own comfort? What are some comforts you can deny?

    Jeff Bogue, 2018

    Core Truth: Tough resolve means taking a hit for Jesus.

    Jeff Bogue commissions students on the last night of Momentum to realize as they go home, they will “take a hit” if they are truly resolved to follow Jesus.  Note the three biblical voices Jeff cites who warn us of the hits we will face as Christ-followers: 1) Jesus warns us we will be hated; 2) Peter predicts we will face fiery trials; 3) Paul acknowledges suffering is inevitable, but it serves to draw us closer to Jesus.

    Talk It Over

    1. Jeff says one of culture’s biggest lies is that God wants to prosper us. He calls it a  heresy. What is heresy? What makes this heresy so awful?
    2. Read 2 Corinthians 4:16-18. What does this teach us about Paul’s resolve in suffering? What can suffering teach us about God? Us?
    3. Jeff speaks candidly about suffering he has faced as a pastor. What makes full-time ministry so potentially painful? Is God calling you to it?
    4. Jeff teaches, “If you go home and fit in, you’re probably not resolved.” Where do you fit in where you shouldn’t? Where do you stand out?
    5. Avoiding little acts of suffering in church (i.e., holding our bladder until the sermon ends) shows little resolve. What little acts of suffering do you avoid for your own comfort? What are some comforts you can deny?